Sometimes working with a large amount of phones (10,000+) it can take a whole day to export into a csv, and makes more sense to view and manipulate data in the live database. Caution should be taken when handling the live database, so if you are not a programmer, you may want to stick to the canned scripts below as an overly broad query could lock up your server!

I was recently tasked with running firmware updates on a large amount of phones, various models for over 100 device pools. Anything that can help organize and divide workload and cut down on unnecessary bulk jobs is a huge help!

UC Guerilla has a good blog on this here
Cisco’s documentation you can find here, but a tough read for a non-programmer

Count the number of devices per type, total:

run sql select count(Device.name) Device_count, typemodel.name Device_Type from Device inner join typemodel on device.tkmodel=typemodel.enum group by typemodel.name

Count the number of phones in each device pool, sorted by device pool name:

run sql select count(d.name), dp.name as DevicePool, tc.name as DeviceType from Device as d inner join DevicePool as dp on d.fkDevicePool=dp.pkid inner join typeClass as tc on tc.enum=d.tkClass group by dp.name, tc.name order by dp.name

Count the number of each type of phone per device pool, sorted by device pool name:

run sql select count(Device.name) Device_count, DevicePool.name Device_Pool, typemodel.name Device_Type from Device inner join DevicePool on Device.fkDevicePool=DevicePool.pkid inner join typemodel on device.tkmodel=typemodel.enum group by DevicePool.name,typemodel.name order by DevicePool.name

 

ILS is a new feature service in CUCM 9.0 that allows for sharing of Directory-URIs between clusters.

A Directory URI is much like an email address, formatted like jlevensailor@ciscolab.com where jlevensailor is the user portion and ciscolab.com is the host portion. The user portion is actually case sensitive, but only in the context of CUCM, and is actually an enterprise parameter that can be set to fix this.

The internet uses dns via _sip._udp/tcp or _sips._tls SRV records to route calls between Directory URIs much like email uses mx records. CUCM uses sip route patterns for Directory URIs much like they use standard route patterns for DNs. To tell CUCM that a particular Directory URI is on-net within a particular multi-cluster environment, ILS was introduced.

*It is recommended to first change the Cluster ID enterprise parameter in both clusters to something unique.

To get started, I’ll assume you have a sip trunk has been created already between the two clusters, directly or via SME. Go to Advanced Features and ILS Configuration.

You’ll change the role to “Hub Cluster” and enter the corresponding clusters domain name or ip-address in the popup. For authentication you can either use TLS certificates and exchange certs (default), or you can use a password. Note: The password does require a restart of the ILS service, in case you were already running this.

The advertised route string is what you will create a sip route pattern for on the other cluster, pointing to the ICT so calls can work. When you are done, you can go ahead and start the service if you haven’t already, wait until synchronization finishes and run a route plan report to confirm:

As you can see, any URI on the remote hub cluster will be discovered, not just those that happen to match the advertised route string, which by default is the cluster FQDN.

The call flow is: nbates@car.lab wants to call test@dur.lab. CUCM checks the CSS of nbates@car.lab and proceeds to search for the URI in the list of ordered partitions as usual. When it finds test@dur.lab, it sees that it is a “Learned URI” from sbcucm.dur.lab, and uses the target from the sip route pattern of “dur.lab” I created to call the remote user.

The benefit of this is that sip route patterns won’t have to be created for each remote domain, just one for each ILS partner cluster. I would imagine you’ll start seeing a blank sip route pattern pointed to VCS/Expressway-C for outside domains and a specific ILS route pattern for internal domains/on-net traffic.

Official Documentation HERE

Well oh well, I guess it’s been a while since I posted anything. I’ve been so busy lately, mostly working in large bat files or manipulating call manager databases.
Something that ticked me off was how you can’t put windows side by side because they are nested inside Excel. The following code makes all Excel files open in a new window!

*Note this is for .xls files, for .xlsx change the (Excel.Sheet.8 to Excel.Sheet.12), For .csv files, it’s Excel.CSV

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTExcel.Sheet.8shellOpen]
@=”&Open”

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTExcel.Sheet.8shellOpencommand]
@=””C:\Program Files (x86)\Microsoft Office\Office14\EXCEL.EXE” /e “%1″”
“command2″=hex(7):78,00,62,00,27,00,42,00,56,00,35,00,21,00,21,00,21,00,21,00,
21,00,21,00,21,00,21,00,21,00,4d,00,4b,00,4b,00,53,00,6b,00,45,00,58,00,43,
00,45,00,4c,00,46,00,69,00,6c,00,65,00,73,00,3e,00,56,00,69,00,6a,00,71,00,
42,00,6f,00,66,00,28,00,59,00,38,00,27,00,77,00,21,00,46,00,49,00,64,00,31,
00,67,00,4c,00,51,00,20,00,2f,00,64,00,64,00,65,00,00,00,00,00

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTExcel.Sheet.8shellOpenddeexec2]
@=”[open(“%1″)]”

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTExcel.Sheet.8shellOpenddeexec2application]
@=”Excel”

[HKEY_CLASSES_ROOTExcel.Sheet.8shellOpenddeexec2topic]
@=”system”

After a googley search, I was lead astray by an older posting on audio file conversion.

I needed to import an odd audio format file into an MOH file on Cisco Call Manager running v 9.x.

I Used Audacity ! from Source Forge !
Changed the sample rate to 8000 – , it was in MONO already – so no issue there. Then exported to OTHER Uncompressed type then OPTIONS – I chose WAV (Microsoft) and U-Law Encoding.
Saved and imported into Call Manger – Call Mangler converted it however it needed to and then it seemed to work !

Wished it were easier – just had to find the right combo –
Ultimately – Cisco wants it in 8000 hz rate/ U-law MONO WAV type.

hope this helps others in a pinch.

Another real easy way to get LIVE audio into a Cisco Voice system is to just use Unity Voicemail that forwards voice messages to an email account. Simply record a voice mail message as the Call handler, on hold message, greeting, etc. and you have an instant audio file in your inbox ready to upload to any system you might be working on. This is especially convenient when you don’t have Vocie Prompt dial-in access.
Again – useful in some situations.

Adding to my post from monday, I had another issue with SRM not changing ip addresses on an Asterisk (CentOS) box, so I had to engineer a workaround..

For PRIMARY = 10.100.1.150 and DR = 10.100.2.150

1. On the linux box, we’ll create two bash scripts, chmod these 755 and stick these in your $PATH.

primary-to-dr.sh
#!/bin/sh
ifconfig eth0 10.100.2.150 netmask 255.255.255.0 up
route add default gw 10.100.2.1 eth0
done

dr-to-primary.sh
#!/bin/sh
ifconfig eth0 10.100.1.150 netmask 255.255.255.0 up
route add default gw 10.100.1.1 eth0
done

2. On the vCenter, install WinSCP and run. Create 2 new sessions with saved credentials and name primary and dr. Connect to each session and accept the certificates!
3. Ensure the following is in the windows PATH, if not, add this directory: C:Program Files (x86)WinSCP
4. Create the batch file below to call winscp, start the session and run the relevant script from step 1.

ifconfig.bat
@echo off
echo “Logging into host and running script”
If EXIST c:primary.txt (winscp primary /command “call primary-to-dr.sh”) ELSE (winscp dr /command “call dr-to-primary.sh”)
echo Exit Value %ERRORLEVEL%
TIMEOUT /t 5 /nobreak

In SRM run the bat file, no flags needed.

VMware advertises the ability to “perform fully automated orchestration of site failover and fallback with a single click.” While this technology is extremely easy to setup and use, it’s oftentimes the small things that cause the biggest headache. SRM uses dns to propogate ip changes from the primary to secondary virtual machines. With windows this is automatic: the servers simply register their new ip addresses in dns. For linux servers, however this is not so easy, especially in my case (an avaya phone system) which provides no access to the CLI. The fix is to create a script.

DNS Server – 192.168.10.1
Primary Site Avaya – 192.168.10.35
Failover Site Avaya- 192.168.15.35

First you’ll want to make sure you are running the SRM service as an account with domain admin rights (assuming you setup the database with windows authentication during setup).

Next you’ll need DNSCMD from the RSAT (remote server administration tools), which you can find here

Below is an example script:

@echo OFF
echo “Removing Records from DNS…”
dnscmd 192.168.10.1 /recorddelete dom.local AVAYA-SRV-01 A /f
echo Exit Value:  %ERRORLEVEL%
TIMEOUT /t 3 /nobreak
dnscmd 192.168.10.1 /recorddelete dom.local AVAYA-SRV-01 A /f
echo Exit Value:  %ERRORLEVEL%
TIMEOUT /t 3 /nobreak

@echo off
echo “Adding Records to DNS ..”
If EXIST c:primary.txt (dnscmd 192.168.10.1 /recordadd dom.local AVAYA-SRV-01 A 192.168.10.35) ELSE (dnscmd 192.168.16.58 /recordadd dom.local AVAYA-SRV-01 A 192.168.15.35)
echo Exit Value:  %ERRORLEVEL%
TIMEOUT /t 5 /nobreak

In SRM, you’ll call the script as:
C:windowssystem32cmd.exe /c c:srmscriptsdnschange.bat

Also, you may notice the “If EXIST c:primary.txt”
It was the most elegant way I could think of the check if the system was in a failover state. This file will exist only on the primary side. Credit to Derek Bickel on this one!